Part 2: Basic uses of “to get” (VIDEO)

Last week, we discussed two of the basic uses of the verb “to get.” Here’s part two of my three part series! The text of the lesson is below the video.

get + adverb particle or preposition

When “get” is followed by an adverb “particle” (which together often make up things like phrasal verbs) or a preposition, “get” almost always refers to movement.

  • I always get up at 7 a.m. (get up = awaken & exit the bed)
  • The old man yelled at the children, “Get out!” (get out = leave, exit)
  • This is my train stop; I’m getting off here. (get off = exit [train or bus])

For some phrases or idioms, the meaning is a little different:

  • She can’t get over her cold. (to get over something = to recover from)
  • What time will you get to my house? (to get [to a place] = to arrive at)

 

get + past participle

When “get” is paired with a past participle, the meaning is often reflexive. This means that the action of the verb is something that the subject does to him / herself.

  • I’m getting married next month. (= I will be married next month.)
  • My bus leaves in 5 minutes! I need to get dressed! (=I need to dress myself.)
  • I got lost when I was in London. (=I was lost; I found myself lost.)

Like last week’s uses of “get”, these are all used very frequently in conversation and sound natural. They are used in casual conversation, but are not impolite or slang, and can be used with anyone.

Do you have questions about using “get”? Let me know!

Tune in next week for Part 3!


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